Manfred Mann Chapter Three — “Sometimes”: Brace for the Obscure (60s rock)! — January 11, 2023

THE GREATEST SONGS OF THE 1960s THAT NO ONE HAS EVER HEARD

698) Manfred Mann Chapter Three — “Sometimes”

Mann, oh Mann, do I love my Manfred Mann Chapter III (see #79, 146), including this “dreamy jazz inflected gem[]”. (Jason, http://therisingstorm.net/manfred-mann-chapter-three-volume-1/) As the Active Listener says:

For a band who’s previous release only a year before had been a singalong cover of Bob Dylan’s The Mighty Quinn, a dark, voodoo jazz-rock LP replete with Albert Ayler inspired free-jazz solos must have come as a shock to long term fans. Clearly this is not your Dad’s Manfred Mann. . . . Snakeskin Garter [see #79], One Way Glass, and Sometimes are all particularly memorable. Mike Hugg’s voice may be an acquired taste for some, but fans of the creepy juju stylings of early Dr John [see #177] are in for a treat.

http://active-listener.blogspot.com/2011/11/manfred-mann-chapter-three-volume-one.html

Mark Allan opines that: “This is as much jazz as rock. There’s hardly any guitar, but a swaggering horn section compensates. Imagine a darker, moodier Traffic with Mann manning the organ instead of Steve Winwood.” (https://www.allmusic.com/album/manfred-mann-chapter-three-mw0000467440)

Rovi Staff supplies some background:

Following the demise of Manfred Mann, Mike Hugg and Manfred Mann continued their jazz/rock path by forming Chapter Three, as a sideline to their lucrative career writing successful television jingles. This brave project was originally called Emanon and . . . featured session work from some of the finest contemporary jazz musicians . . . . The group immediately established themselves on the progressive rock circuit, but could not break out of the small club environment. Their two albums were excellent and imaginative but came as a considerable shock to any fans who expected anything akin to Manfred Mann. The band was blighted with problems due to Mann and Hugg having to support the venture financially, and because of trying to establish themselves as something other than a pop group. . . . Manfred soon returned to a more commercial path with Manfred Mann’s Earth Band.

https://www.allmusic.com/artist/manfred-mann-chapter-three-mn0001278308

Jazz Music Archives adds:

The band’s approach centred around the “time, no changes” approach of Miles Davis and John Coltrane applied to slow, funky grooves with voodoo lyrics inspired by Dr John alternating with blaring big-band horn riffs and improvised free-jazz solos reminiscent of Ornette Coleman and Albert Ayler. Although intelligible at a time when artists like Davis himself were crossing over into the rock/funk field and American “jazz-rock” ensembles such as Blood, Sweat and Tears and The Mothers of Invention espoused brass sections and atonality, the formula was limited and the band expensive to maintain, so it was short-lived and disbanded after two albums. Mann went on to form Manfred Mann’s Earth Band in 1971.

https://www.jazzmusicarchives.com/artist/manfred-mann-chapter-three

And Progman says:

Chapter III was formed after the break up of the (Chapter II) line up of Manfred Mann in 1969 which featured singer Mike D’Abo, not forgetting the legendary (Chapter I) line up in the early 60s which featured singer Paul Jones. . . . Chapter III turned their backs on three minute Pop singles and light hearted songs to develop a more Jazz and Progressive sound often had lengthy tracks with solos. . . . Sadly for Manfred Mann’s Chapter 3 the band had unsuccessful record sales and paid the price for this and unfortunate for Manfred Mann’s Chapter III they had disbanded late in 1970. . . . A discovery has been made that an album “Volume 3” was recorded but was never released.

http://www.progarchives.com/artist.asp?id=2425

Finally, Jason again:

Mann had taken in bassist Steve York from the legendary progressive psychedelic band East of Eden. . . . Volume 1 was something that Mike Hugg and Mann had wanted to do for sometime but feared the possibility of a commercial failure. Hugg handles most of the lead vocals on a record . . . . The sound is very progressive, peppered with jazzy horns, keyboards/organ, a slow stoned ambience, creative arrangements and Hugg’s quite original although bizarre vocals.

http://therisingstorm.net/manfred-mann-chapter-three-volume-1/

Here they are live:

I have added a Facebook page for Brace for the Obscure 60s Rock! If you like what you read and hear and feel so inclined, please visit and “like” my Facebook page by clicking here.

Pay to Play! The Off the Charts Spotify Playlist! + Brace for the Obscure 60s Rock Merchandise

Please consider helping to support my website/blog by contributing $6 a month for access to the Off the Charts Spotify Playlist. Using a term familiar to denizens of Capitol Hill, you pay to play! (“relating to or denoting an unethical or illicit arrangement in which payment is made by those who want certain privileges or advantages in such arenas as business, politics, sports, and entertainment” — dictionary.com).

The playlist includes all the “greatest songs of the 1960’s that no one has ever heard” that are available on Spotify. The playlist will expand each time I feature an available song.

All new subscribers will receive a Brace for the Obscure 60s Rock magnet. New subscribers who sign up for a year will also receive a Brace for the Obscure 60s Rock t-shirt or baseball cap. See pictures on the Pay to Play page.

When subscribing, please send me an e-mail (GMFtma1@gmail.com) or a comment on this site letting me know an e-mail address/phone number/Facebook address, etc. to which I can send instructions on accessing the playlist and a physical address to which I can sent a magnet/t-shirt/baseball cap. If choosing a t-shirt, please let me know the gender and size you prefer.

Just click on the first blue block for a month to month subscription or the second blue block for a yearly subscription.

One thought on “Manfred Mann Chapter Three — “Sometimes”: Brace for the Obscure (60s rock)! — January 11, 2023

  1. Do you know did Manfred Mann record new version of the ‘Mighty Quinn’ 1968-1969? I have heard smashing magical version in Finnish radio and ‘Heartbeat’ tv show. If they did, they didnt release it after all, maybe sent to some radio stations.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: